News

Latest News

Hope Lost and Glass Chin heat up the summer viewing

09/10/2015

As the weather heats up so does the upcoming action. November 18 occasions two very different movies delving into the murky depths of the underworld. Monster Pictures deliver on Blu-ray Hope Lost, a violent foray into the frightening world of sex trafficking while Vendetta Films release on DVD Glass Chin, a boxing drama about a former champion and his struggle to win back respect.

Starring Danny Trejo, Mischa Barton, Michael Madsen and Daniel Baldwin, Hope Lost follows the journey of Sofia (Francesca Agostini), a Romanian girl who dreams of becoming a movie star. In a night club she meets Gabriel (Andrey Chernyshov), who claims to be casting roles for a TV show he is producing in Italy. Instead of landing her dream role, however, she is sold to a pair of pimps and made to walk the streets. She soon bonds with Alina (Barton) and another young victim Eva (Alessia Navarro). With the arrival of the mysterious Ettore (Baldwin) the girls believe hope they are on the cusp of being set free. Only this time they are auctioned off to a mysterious film producer. Only for Sofia her first is also likely to be her last.

Glass Chin, starring Corey Stoll (Ant Man), Marin Ireland (Side Effects), Kelly Lynch (Road House), Yul Vazquez (Captain Phillips) and Billy Crudup (Watchmen), is a redemption parable. Bud Gordon (Stoll) is a former champion. The retired boxer now lives an anonymous life in New Jersey in a rundown apartment with his girlfriend. He longs for his former glory days in Manhattan. When crooked restauranteur offers him a deal to get back in the game Bud is faced with a dilemma of realising his ambitions at the risk of destroying his integrity.

Nominated for Best Narrative Feature at the Tribeca Film Festival Noah Buschel's film has been hailed by US critics. Gary Goldstein in the Los Angeles Times raves. "Punchy dialogue, sharply drawn characters," he notes, "and excellent performances fuel Glass Chin."

"Glass Chin is powered by how viscerally direct and spontaneous the film feels," notes Slate.com.

Share: